Mobility Management

 

Mobility Management

Beispiel
Mobility - here a motorway in the Canton of Uri, Switzerland, is a major issue in Alpine Development (Source: K. CONRADIN).

Transportation is one of the key issues in the Alps. Transport infrastructure has strong impacts on spatial structures. Goods and passenger transport in and across the Alps play an important role for the regional and national economy. Transportation is a key aspect of Alpine tourism. Transport causes air and noise pollution and leads to negative impacts on environment and human beings. Therefore transport policy is one of the hot spots of the Alpine Convention.

based on ACKERMANN et al. (2006) & CIPRA (2007)

by Helmut Hiess, Rosniak & Partner GmbH

Two "killer arguments" dominate the public debate on this issue:
  1. The "global competition of regions"-argument: "Improvement of regional performance by infrastructural development is needed to survive in the global competition of regions".
  1. The "environmental devastation" argument: "The development of transport infrastructure causes environmental devastation".
While there is empirical evidence on negative environmental impacts of the transport system, the positive relation between transport system and regional development is mainly based on a strong belief.

Therefore, the CIPRA-Project "Future in the Alps" focused on the question of how mobility and the development of regional structures are connected. A platform for a rational debate should be provided based on the latest scientific insights.
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Further Readings & Links

ACKERMANN et al. (2006)
"Future in the Alps" report of project question 4 on Leisure, Tourism and Commuter Mobility.

CIPRA Info 82 (2007)
The article on pages 18 to 21 summarises the outcomes of the "Future in the Alps" report mentioned above.

WENIGER (2007)
Summary of the results of the "Future in the Alps"-project about leisure, tourism and commuter mobility.

MAUSSHARDT (2007)
A best practice example taken from the newest Alpine report published in 2007. It describes Inficon, a company in Liechtenstein that rewards its employees if they do not take the car to work.