Regional Value Added

 

Endogenous Resources

Protected Areas

The main task of protected areas is to protect and to produce value added in the conservation of nature. Due to this, the values of ecosystem services such as habitats, biodiversity, scenic beauty etc. are conserved and generate a long-term benefit for the region.

A protected area may lead to positive inputs, such as:

  • New, additional funding opportunities.
  • New income by entrance fees or merchandising.
  • New services and products that are provided.
  • Added value by regional brands (tourism, products, services).
  • Improvement of "soft factors", such as: networks, inter- and intraregional co-operation, knowledge, etc.
Beispiel Beispiel
The main task of protected areas is to protect and to produce value added in the conservation of nature (Source:
www.biosphaere.ch).

Due to regional marketing and networking between local stakeholders, protected areas can also increase social and economic value added within the region.

On the other hand a loss of value added may result from:

  • "Import" of products and services that cannot be provided in the region (typical example: expertise and consultancy)
  • Lowered investment: protected areas may of course prevent large scale investment.
  • Lowered production rate: protected areas may also lead to a lowered production (e.g. in agriculture, forestry or in other sectors); usually this loss gets compensated.
See also tutorial "Protected Areas".
Further Readings & Links

CIPRA INFO 82
For several article closely related to this topic, see this PDF. It contains a summary of the future in the alps report on protected areas.

Innovative Traditional Production Combined with Tourism


Beispiel
Innovative traditional and cultural productions play an important role in Alpine regions to maintain living and working opportunities (Source: CIPRA).
Innovative traditional and cultural productions like handicraft and agriculture play an important role in Alpine regions to maintain living and working opportunities. In the Alps, the use of land has been characterized by farming and forestry for centuries. Today, farming includes a wide range of functions in mountain areas such as the production of high-quality, fresh, organic foodstuffs and the preservation of cultural and recreational landscapes, which are one of the main resources for mountain tourism (DAX 2001, KAH 2004).

Therefore, a promising strategy to increase value added within a mountain region is to make use of traditional and local resources and to generate a cross-sector network between local stakeholders.

Saving cultural landscape by adopting properties, handing out certificates for small tourism co-operations and producing innovative local niche-products like dairy products or handicraft presents a promising potential for the future to generate value added in alpine regions. The aim is eventually to increase the "savoir-faire" and to constitute a platform for economic promotion as well as for ecological actions.

For further information on tourism, refer to the tutorial "Alps and Tourism".

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"Future in the Alps Workshop"
Workshop on how tourism can contribute to the value added in mountainous areas (in German and Italian).